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Old 02-06-2013, 01:47 PM
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Originally Posted by bigjack View Post
The original BB Bruins were more of a gang up on a guy team and anytime their guy was losing the fight, 3-4 Bruins would come jumping into the fight and a guy like McKenzie would start to sucker guys!
The 3rd man in rule implemented in 1971 was because of the Bruins gang tactics! Overall they were not great fighters!
Spot on BJ.

From Sanderson..

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A bunch of us came into the league around the same time--me, Ace Bailey and Wayne Cashman. It was a young team, but we took care of each other. Bobby Orr made a rule that no one was ever to be in a fight alone. You were only alone until the second guy got there. If you hit one of us, the closest teammate was going to clock you--just drill you in the back of the head, cross-check you or sucker-punch you. Pow! Whatever it took. Eventually, the NHL instituted the third-man-in rule to eliminate this.

All of a sudden, the team that got pushed around the year before looked like it was going to be entirely different. ... The team had size, skill and sandpaper. This is the moment the Big, Bad Bruins were born.
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Old 02-06-2013, 03:52 PM
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When it comes to the impact they had on the sport and the league as a whole, I think that you have to go with the Flyers. There's a reason why the Broad Street Bullies are legendary.

However, if you're talking pure toughness and who I would rather not have to face, the answer is the Bruins. You have three of the top 25 guys of all-time in O'Reilly, Wensink and Jonathan, plus depth. No one is looking forward to that.
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Old 02-06-2013, 04:30 PM
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When it comes to the impact they had on the sport and the league as a whole, I think that you have to go with the Flyers. There's a reason why the Broad Street Bullies are legendary.

However, if you're talking pure toughness and who I would rather not have to face, the answer is the Bruins. You have three of the top 25 guys of all-time in O'Reilly, Wensink and Jonathan, plus depth. No one is looking forward to that.
As far as the fighting and bending the rules and the way the game was called to their advantage, definitely the Flyers in terms of changing hockey and the business of hockey too. They sold lots of tickets and teams, especially in the WHA, added fighters to compete but also for the box office. Behind the bench, Fred Shero was a hell of an innovator, studying what the Soviets were up to, first to add an assistant coach. Maybe it's no coincidence the Flyers haven't won a cup since he left and he did get the Rags to the finals in 79.

The Bruins changed the game more, I think, when you look at the big picture. Orr changed the position of defenseman forever. The way Boston used their big forwards, especially that record shattering Espo line, changed the game. Even Cheevers in goal was kind of a hybrid goalie, not the old school stand up, who'd leave the crease and play the puck. It's no accident Cheevers is an HOFer and the Bruins never got another Cup after he left for Cleveland in the WHA. Four years later, he came back but was past his prime by then.

Both teams changed the game a great deal. For the most part, very much for the better.
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Old 02-06-2013, 06:57 PM
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Awesome thread. Both of these teams were before my time. I know more about the 70's Flyers than I do about the Bruins, but reading the posts from you guys who remember and have more knowledge on these two teams is awesome. Keep it up, reading the thoughts and opinions of you guys is pretty neat.
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Old 02-07-2013, 09:49 AM
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One of my favorite articles on the Bullies. It's a long, but interesting read if you have the time.

January 22, 1984
Section SPORTS Edition

TEN YEAR AGO, FLYERS WON THE CUP - AND A CITY'S HEART

It was a time of the Arab oil embargo and gas lines, of Watergate and the Patty Hearst kidnapping, of Hank Aaron's passing Babe Ruth on the all-time home-run list. But in Philadelphia, it was the Broad Street Bullies against the world. And on the afternoon of May 19, 1974, all the high voltage and controversy that had throbbed through an entire National Hockey League season peaked at the Spectrum the Philadelphia Flyers against the Boston Bruins, Game 6 of the Stanley Cup finals, Philadelphia leading the best-of-seven series by three games to two.

A red carpet was rolled onto the Spectrum ice. The klieg lights were shut down, and a spotlight followed Kate Smith to the microphone, where she blew kisses and waved to the crowd, clasped her hands above her head and flashed the victory sign. The crowd of 17,007 went berserk. She sang the Flyers' good luck/fight song, "God Bless America."

Then, with the Spectrum in a frenzy, Rick MacLeish scored the only goal, Bernie Parent saved the way only he could then, and the Flyers won their first Stanley Cup. And a city that had been known for the W. C. Fields jokes and its losers image began to overdose on joy, booze and self-esteem.

"Bernie! Bernie! Bernie!" thousands chanted into the night. "One! Two! Three! Four!" others screamed. "Who in hell is Bobby Orr?"

It has been almost a decade since Clarkie, Bernie, "the Hammer," "the Hound," "the Bird," "the Moose" and the rest of the "Broad Street Bullies" brought the first of two Stanley Cups to Philadelphia. All except Bobby Clarke, Bill Barber and Rick MacLeish have retired, but even though all were foreigners when they first arrived in Philadelphia, no fewer than 11 have made their permanent homes in the area. And because anniversaries are times for celebrations and memories, here, for those who lived through it and for those who have only heard about it, is a look at an epochal season and at what has become of the city, the sport and the Flyers on that never-to-be-forgotten team.

It's been almost 10 years since the brilliant spring day of May 20, 1974, when the Flyers paraded up Broad Street before a crowd of two million people - many of whom didn't know a hockey puck from a hunk of coal - who turned out to toast their heroes. Ticker tape flew, confetti rained, banners waved and tears glistened. Thousands of children played hooky. And after it was over, after a delirious celebration that was compared to that of V-J Day at the end of World War II, it would henceforth be known in Philadelphia as "the day of The Parade."

Bobby Taylor, now the Flyers' radio and TV analyst, was Parent's backup goaltender at the time. "It's kind of funny," he says, recalling that day. ''For so long, this big dark cloud had hung over Philadelphia, and 20 Canadians came along and just blew it away."

A decade ago, the Flyers were still relatively new in Philadelphia - their initial season was 1967-68 - but their blue-collar, two-fisted approach to the NHL already had captured the hearts of sports fans who had had nothing to really cheer about since the 1966-67 Sixers and the 1960 Eagles. The Flyers would go on to become the most penalized team in NHL history, to repeat as Stanley Cup champions in 1975, and, for at least one afternoon (Jan. 11, 1976), to become the most revered hockey club in North America for beating in the Spectrum a Soviet Red Army team that, until then, had been unbeatable. And then, almost as suddenly as they began, the glory years came to an end.

It's difficult to assess precisely how the unbridled affection that Philadelphia showered upon the Flyers affected the city's other professional sports franchises. However, it is a fact that the Phillies, Eagles and 76ers suddenly went on to develop championship and near-championship clubs, too.

It may have inspired other teams to work harder," says Sixers general manager Pat Williams. "I think it was a subtle influence, because we all saw how the city would respond. It broke the ice. Above all, it began to spin the atmosphere around in this town. Philadelphia had become a winning city, and all the negativism began to disappear." "It gave birth to the winning era in Philadelphia, and you have to give the Flyers the credit for that," says former Eagles general manager Jim Murray. "We were at the bottom. We were beat up. And the Flyers told us, 'Look at this. If you do it, look at what you get.' "

For all that they inspired, the reign of the Broad Street Bullies was brief, because the same take-no-prisoners tactics that had contributed so much to their dominance swiftly brought about their demise. As waves of media indignation accompanied their arrival and departure from cities throughout North America - and as arenas were packed to overflowing - the NHL introduced sweeping rules against fighting and brawling, which put the Broad Street Bullies out of business. As a result, the mayhem on ice has abated. But so, too, has hockey's popularity. Attendance is uninspiring, even in Philadelphia. So are television ratings. And now, although the NHL originally expanded in size to attract a national following, and although it has 21 franchises flung throughout North America, it once more concedes that it has only a regional sport to sell.

Although the Philadelphia Flyers officially were born on Feb. 6, 1966, the exact date of birth of the Broad Street Bullies is not known. What is known is that they were conceived in May 1968, in the aftermath of a violent playoff series against the then-bruising St. Louis Blues.

The Flyers managed to win the NHL's Western Division in that, their first NHL season. Then came the playoffs, and the Blues, with their ''policemen" Bob and Barclay Plager, and Noel Picard. "The Plagers ganged up on Ed Van Impe and broke his thumb," Flyers owner Ed Snider says. "And then their big Frenchman, Picard, cold-cocked our Claude LaForge from the blind side. They beat us in seven games. And they beat us up, too."

Before long, Snider was meeting with his coach and soon-to-be general manager, Keith Allen. "We decided that we may not build an intimidating team, but we will build one that won't be intimidat-ed," he says.

A year later, the Flyers drafted Bobby Clarke, Dave Schultz and Don Saleski, and the year after that, Bob Kelly. Three years later, in the 1972-73 season, the Flyers' brain trust, which by then included coach Fred Shero, unleashed Schultz, Kelly and Saleski on the NHL. They also called up their old tormentors, the Blues, and traded for Andre Dupont. Almost immediately - on Dec. 29, 1972 - came a riot in Vancouver's Pacific Coliseum, where the Flyers punched out the Canucks and climbed into the stands to battle with fans. The next stop was Los Angeles, where Schultz pummeled the Kings' irritator, Terry Harper. Before those two games, the Flyers had been 2-13-5 on the road for the season and 43-120-48 in their history. Next stop, Atlanta. "We'll win our share on the road this year," Shero predicted. "Is that a guarantee?" he was asked. "I guarantee it." A few hours later, the Flyers terrorized the Flames in the Omni and won the game, and from that night until the afternoon the Cup was won, they were 30-19-2 on the road.

What once had been a small, meek team that "threw snow" at the sight of its own shadow had been transformed into a big, tough outfit that was fully representative of a big, tough city - if not necessarily one of "brotherly love."

Revered in Philadelphia, the breezy, swaggering Bullies were a bunch that fans in enemy cities loved to hate. And as they double-timed it through airport concourses, hooting and cackling past newsstands where headlines, in so many words, screamed, "Lock up your wives and daughters; the Bullies are coming," the Flyers did resemble a shipload of sailors getting a head start on shore leave. "We didn't know many people in Philly then, so we did everything together," says Barber. "We didn't have families, so it was just dressing room to the ice, hit the road again, hit the nearest bar." "They were a real gas house gang, both on and off the ice," Keith Allen recalls. "I was management, so I wasn't part of their inner circle. But at the Christmas parties and others we had, I could tell that they were a bunch of characters who really enjoyed each other's company."

In fact, they were a crude, ribald mixture of players in the twilight of their careers and others whose sun was first starting to rise. There were grizzled veterans such as Ed Van Impe, Joe Watson and the late Barry Ashbee who had spent years on the fringes with other NHL clubs or had been rescuedfrom the endless bus trips of the minors. And there were shaggy-maned kids such as Barber, Tom Bladon and Orest Kindrachuk who were only a year or two out of Junior A hockey and who reveled in the bright lights of the big time. And of course, there was Shero.

"Freddie the Fog," the Bullies nicknamed him, and aptly so. After 17 years of coaching winning teams in the New York Rangers farm system, Shero arrived behind the Flyers bench in 1971 with his smoked-lens glasses and sideburns, his brooding, near-reclusive demeanor, and such outrageous statements as "I want to be miserable; that's what makes me happy. I think you can't know joy if you don't know sorrow. If you are happy all the time, there must be something wrong." Shero was a devotee of Soviet hockey and conditioning theories, and before long, in practice, the Flyers were stickhandling with bouncing tennis balls; pulling, squeezing and pushing one another in two-man tug-of-wars, and conducting line rushes with three pucks instead of one. And, at Shero's urging, the franchise hired Mike Nykoluk as the first full-time assistant coach in NHL history.

An eccentric innovator, Shero was all but loved by his players, who eventually made him as much a part of their cadre as a coach could possibly be. And that meant he was not spared from the players' practical jokes. One morning in Boston, he arrived at Logan Airport with several boxes of live Maine lobsters he was bringing back to Philadelphia. But after Shero sat down and opened a newspaper, Clarke quietly sneaked over, untied the boxes and set the lobsters free. Within moments, the dark crustaceans were crawling throughout the boarding area, and shocked travelers were leaping out of the way. Finally, there was the coach of the Philadelphia Flyers on his hands and knees, his face rose-red and glasses steamed, frantically trying to stuff the lobsters back in the boxes. "Funny? We're dyin'," recalls Bill "Cowboy" Flett. "Freddie never showed his emotions much, but I think that was one time he was really ticked off." "I was embarrassed," Shero says now. "I'd have loved it if the joke had been on somebody else, but the guy who was responsible for those lobsters was me."

Before and after practice, the Flyers clubhouse was a veritable house of horrors where nothing - wives, mothers, national heritage or religion - was sacred. For instance, Van Impe was continually opening the mail of the Watson brothers, Joe and Jimmy, that they received from their home town of Smithers, British Columbia (population 4,000). He didn't read the letters; he merely opened the envelopes to infuriate the Watsons. Van Impe and Joe Watson were forever needling Andre Dupont. One morning, his ears crimson, the 205-pound French Canadian suddenly leaped to his feet in fury - and stepped on the foot of Tom Bladon. "If he'd taken his skates off like I had, it wouldn't have been so bad," says Bladon. "As it was, he almost cut off three of my toes." Shirts, sweaters, trousers, sport jackets, socks, boots and shoes were always under siege, and because the culprit - usually Clarke - only rarely could be determined, snipping and carving was rampant.

One day, the first of a 10-day road trip, Parent cut off the legs of Ross Lonsberry's only suit. Lonsberry thought that Saleski did it. Saleski thought that his sport jacket had been sliced up by Kelly. And Kelly thought. . . . When the Flyers finally returned home from that trip, hundreds of dollars' worth of clothing and footwear had been destroyed. Another time, after four days in a Boston suburb during the playoffs, Kelly reached into the closet for his suitcase, recoiled at the odor and started to pack for the trip home. But inside the suitcase was a dead goose. (It had been beheaded the night the Flyers checked in.)

"If a half-dozen guys went into a bar and pulled up nine chairs, you just knew the seventh, eighth and ninth would have Flyers in them sooner or later," says Terry Crisp. "No matter where they were going or where they had been that night, they'd find that table. It was almost eerie, but that's a team." Yet for all their boozing and partying, rarely did a disciplinary problem reach Shero's office. "We all got out of line now and then off the ice," says Joe Watson. ''It didn't matter so long as you produced on the ice. But if a guy was coming off such a lousy night that he couldn't pull his weight the next, he had holy hell to pay in that dressing room. The guys just wouldn't stand for it. We knew we couldn't afford any passengers." "You'd be playing with a hangover, feeling like somebody'd just poured a gallon of Jack Daniels in you," recalls Lonsberry. "You'd say, 'I'm sick, I feel like hell, but I don't have an excuse, so I'd better perform.' We always played better with a guilty conscience."

"Usually the guys on a team who like to screw around form their own little group," says Clarke. "But on that team, there weren't any little groups. It was one big group, and Freddie had a kind of us-against-the-world type philosophy. It was, 'Damn management, damn the sportswriters, damn everybody else but us - we're all in this together.' " And never was the commitment more evident than in the few hours before game time. "The feeling became overwhelming as soon as they closed that dressing- room door," says Bill Clement. "You'd watch your friends being taped up, guys getting ready to play when they could hardly walk, and all of a sudden, everybody else outside the door was a distant cousin."

Even a decade later, the 1974 Cup champions insist that they were never ordered to fight by Shero. His exact words were "I'm not asking you to fight, but I demand that when a fight breaks out, you take a man. You don't have to throw punches, but you have to take a man." Nonetheless, when Shero sent certain combinations of Flyers over the boards - say, Schultz, Kelly and Saleski on the forward line and Dupont on defense - the message was clear. ''It was scary sometimes," says Crisp. "You just knew that before the puck was even dropped, all hell was gonna break loose. And if I was out there, I knew guys from the other team were gonna be looking for me because they wanted no part of the Hammer and the Hound," he adds, referring to Schultz and Kelly. "Believe me, during those brawls I grabbed a lot of sweaters and did a lot of dancing, holding and asking about the wife and kids."

The Broad Street Bullies turned intimidation into a science that worked wonders against entire teams, especially in the Spectrum. Indeed, they now say that, to understand fully how reluctant opposing players were to play in Philadelphia, a Flyer had to be traded elsewhere, as most of them eventually were. "With Pittsburgh," Van Impe recalls, "you almost had to shove them over the boards to get them on the ice in the Spectrum. That stuff about the Philadelphia flu was no joke with the Penguins." Joe Watson, who eventually was sold to Colorado, remembers the afternoon that the Rockies team bus was cruising into Philadelphia and stopped at the red light at the base of the Platt Memorial Bridge. Sitting next to him, gazing through the window at the piles of cars there that have been mashed into squares by a compressor, was Randy Rota. "Jesus, Joe," Rota said, "if we're not careful tomorrow night, that could be us."

Perhaps the team's most notorious explosion was the one at the Pacific Coliseum, the year before they won the first Cup. As a result of that incident, seven Flyers had to fly to Vancouver after the season for a court appearance to answer charges ranging from common assault to "using obscene language and wielding hockey sticks in close proximity to spectators in a general seating area for spectators." Naturally, the Flyers considered this just another cause for serious libation, and the night before their court appearance, all were in the lounge of the Bayshore Inn as Gil Stein, the team's legal counsel, walked in. When Stein suggested that Flett would present a better image in court if he shaved off his beard the next morning, Ashbee calmly struck a match, leaned across the table and set Flett's dark forest of whiskers aflame.

According to those who were there, the Cowboy didn't bat an eye. Casually roaming one hand down one side of his face and then the other, he just as calmly smothered the blaze, reached for his glass, emptied it and - smiling at Ashbee - ordered another round. "Stein couldn't believe it," Saleski recalls. "When he left, his face was white."

The next day, Lonsberry was cleared of all charges, but Van Impe, Ashbee, Flett, Saleski, Taylor and Joe Watson each were fined $500. Taylor also received a 30-day jail term for pushing a police officer, but the sentence was appealed and later suspended.

Often during the Bullies' reign, it was after the Flyers had forged a substantial lead - and after the will to resist had drained from their opponents - that some games turned into scenes of a predator having finally cornered its prey. Recently, Clement was having lunch at an Atlanta restaurant when the conversation turned to the Flyers' assault on Mike Christie of the now-defunct Seals in the Oakland Coliseum. Within moments, Clement's eyes were filled with tears, and he could hardly speak as he recalled the incident. "There was no underlying reason behind it, but a fight started between Christie and the Hound and Saleski in the penalty box. It was two against one, and Jim Neilson was the only teammate of Christie's who tried to even it up. But I jumped on Neilson so he couldn't help. "Well, here are the Hound and Saleski throwing blows at Christie, and he never had a chance. You could hear the smack! of skin on skin, and Christie's got cuts above both eyes, and there's blood everywhere. "Finally, Christie just gives up. 'Go ahead, you bastards,' he says. 'Just go ahead and hit me again if you want to.' "God, it was awful. But I remember trying to deal with two instincts at the same time. One was allegiance to your teammates - and this was just something that was supposed to happen at that particular juncture. But the other instinct was, 'Here's a human being being bludgeoned! Why aren't you - meaning me - helping him!' "I haven't thought about that night for a long time now, and I can hardly talk about it. "I still feel so guilty."

Although the championship itself came the following year, everyone had begun to believe in the cause in the spring of 1973. That's when the Flyers - who had missed the playoffs the previous season - defeated the Minnesota North Stars in the quarterfinals. Two nights later, in sudden-death overtime of the opening game of the semifinals at Montreal, MacLeish stole the puck and scored, and the Flyers shocked the heavily favored Canadiens, 5-4 - right there in the hallowed Forum. Although the Canadiens went on to sweep the next four games, there was no longer a Flyer who didn't believe. "All we talked about," Clarke recalls, "was how we couldn't wait for September to come."

The next season, the Flyers soared to the Western Division championship with a 50-16-12 record, the finest in their history. Clarke, MacLeish and Barber led the scoring parade, and Parent was virtually unbeatable at the other end of the ice with a 1.89 goals-against average and an astonishing 12 shutouts. What made Parent's work all the more remarkable, however, was that with Schultz (348 penalty minutes), Dupont (216), Saleski (131), and Kelly (130) sparking the bench-clearing brawls, the Broad Street Bullies rolled up an NHL record 1,742 minutes in penalties - and played literally hours of the season short-handed.

In the playoff quarterfinals, the Flyers doused the Atlanta Flames in four straight games. Then they faced the New York Rangers in a seven-game semifinal series that the Bullies, to a man, insist was the most brutally fought in which they ever played. Tragically, the carnage included a career-ending injury to Barry Ashbee, who was struck in the right eye by a slapshot.

'After the fifth game, I was so angry I felt like going on the ice and killing somebody," New York's Brad Park says of the series, which produced a record 408 minutes in penalties. "I was so fed up with the stuff they were pulling, I wanted to give it right back. But when I thought about it more carefully, I almost got sick. I decided if I had to maim somebody to win the Stanley Cup, it wasn't worth it. It's a sport, it's entertainment, right?"

Having finally subdued the Rangers, the Flyers found themselves underdogs in the finals, where the Bruins - with the incomparable Bobby Orr and record- setting line of Phil Esposito, Wayne Cashman and Ken Hodge - were heavily favored for their third Cup in five years. But, as they had done all season, the Flyers ran roughshod over the odds.

Before the fourth game of the Boston series, Shero - who was always leaving carefully typed inspirational messages in the Flyers' dressing cubicles and tacking others on their bulletin board - scribbled these words on the blackboard "Win together now and we walk together forever."

Many of his players concede that the phrase sounded corny at the time. But now that a decade has flown, all agree that time has infused those words with new and deeper meaning. "I'm not surprised," Shero says. "Most of them were kids then. They're men now."

Nearly all of them are out of the game now, and for many, the adjustment has been difficult. Some, like Gary Dornhoefer, Lonsberry and Kindrachuk, are trying on new skates in the insurance business. Kelly runs a liquor store in Deptford, N.J.; Saleski is a regional sales manager for ARA Foods Inc., and Schultz is still taking penalties for his controversial book about the Flyers. Four are still involved in hockey - Parent as the Flyers' goaltenders coach, Simon Nolet as an assistant coach of the Quebec Nordiques, and Terry Crisp and Andre Dupont as general manager/coaches of Junior A teams. In all cases, the retired 1974 Flyers are working many more hours for much less money than they earned as players. And at least a few labor with the harsh thought that, whatever endeavor they finally choose, it may never be so stimulating and financially rewarding as was playing the game they loved.

"It's been no picnic," says Bladon, who works for United Van Lines in Edmonton. "In a hockey game, the team as a whole does something right, and you won the hockey game. But in business, you do something right and you don't find out whether it was right for six months. That's one of the hardest parts." "When you can't wait to get up in the morning and get to work, that's what I want to do," says Schultz, who is a vice president with his brother Ray's cable-television company in Delaware. "Yeah, it's kind of dull. I should be looking upon it as a challenge, but I guess I haven't reached that point yet. ''When I was playing, I never had any trouble getting to sleep. No matter what happened, I just blocked it out of my mind. Now I have trouble getting to sleep sometimes."

"It's just like Gordie Howe said," says Kelly. "He said, 'They teach you how to play, but they don't teach you how to quit.' " But Van Impe, who endured a few rocky years with a skating rink in New Jersey after he retired, has since gone on to become a successful insurance broker with Alexander & Alexander in Philadelphia. And he contends that, whatever adjustments some of his former teammates may be confronting now, they too will ultimately be equal to the challenges of the real world. "Winning does something to you," he says, "and when you think of the names of all the excellent players who aren't engraved on the Stanley Cup, it makes you think you can do anything. I actually think I could change careers right now and do it successfully, and there are a lot of doctors and lawyers who can't say that. And when you're talking about the guys on our Cup teams, you aren't talking about guys who go, 'Duhhh, what's one plus one?' "

Still, it's the 11 players who have made their permanent homes in the Philadelphia area who are continually reminded of the very special place the Stanley Cup champions carved in the heart of the city. It is impossible to define the role they may have played in the city's renaissance, but Diane Van Impe believes that the Flyers helped give it a start. ''The Flyers were underdogs; they weren't supposed to win, but they did. I don't know if 20 families had anything to do with what's happened in Philadelphia since that time, but I'd like to think they did in their own little way."

Last edited by Howatt8; 02-07-2013 at 10:18 AM.
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  #21 (permalink)  
Old 02-07-2013, 10:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Flyer_Frank View Post
McKenzie, Green as Bruins are a year or so ahead of my time. Cheevers first go round with them is too. I think that WHA jump by a prime Cheevers might have cost the B's another cup in there. He was pretty feisty in goal, much more so than the more cool and collected parent, although V Hadfield got under his skin when Bernie was still a Leaf . . . . the famous mask incident.
Green was hated in his day, outside of Boston anyway. He was a notorious stickman. Back in the day, I used to hate the Bruins, and especially Ted Green. He was the main culpret in what was once a great rivalry, Bruins-Rangers.

Somewhere around 65/66, Green viciously speared perennial Lady Byng candidate, Phil Goyette. This incensed Ranger owner, William Jennings so much so that he put a $500.00 bounty on Green's head.

I recall going to a game shortly thereafter and Arnie Brown was the only Ranger that tried to collect it, twice. He didn't win either of them, lol.

It was also another night that the Bruins needed a police escort out of New York.

IMO, Cashman was the toughest of those late60s/early 70s Bruins. Not unlike Green, Cashman too was a notorious stick man and probably the most dangerous of all the Bruins. Cashman was a very good fighter, one of the best of that era, but he'd just as soon ram his stick down your throat as drop the gloves.

Tiger Williams told of an incident that occurred between he and Cashman back in the 70's. According to Williams, Terry O'Reilly had wrestled him to the ice during a brawl in Boston. Cashman kicked Williams in the head with such force that the blade sliced through his helmet and opened a cut that required six stitches. O'Reilly whispered to Williams to tuck his head under his shoulder, preventing Cashman from inflicting any further damage. Tiger stated that if it hadn't been for O'Reilly, he may have suffered a serious head injury.

That story speaks volumes about both Cashman and O'Reilly.

I remember Cashman getting into a stick fight with Dennis Hextall during a game of the week. Dennis was no angel either and both guys starting whacking each other until finally Cashman took a two-handed baseball bat type swing at Hextall's head. Fortunately it missed or who knows what might have happened.

Tell you though, no one attacked the corners with any more authority than Cashman. He'd slash, hack, use his elbows, etc.. He was as mean and vicious as they came. Opposing players took their life in their hands going into the corners with Cashman, lol.

He was also a valuable and integral part of those Bruins teams. Without him, they may not have won those two cups. He did a lot of the dirty work that made it easy for Esposito to could get all those goals. He was as valuable to that team as anyone.
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Old 02-07-2013, 05:02 PM
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I know MacLeish was involved in a 3 way deal . . . he went to Philly, Parent went to TO and the Bruins ended up with Mike Walton, who eventually jumped. Leach and I think Boldirev went to the Seals in the Vadnais deal, so some value did get moved around.

The Bruins got hard up for goaltending after Cheevers jumped, so they had to deal Fred Stanfield for Gilbert and inexplicably gave away Don Awrey and still made the finals in 73-74.

It was that monster Espo/Ratelle/Park deal that really brought an end to the classic BB Bruins with Orr being about finished at roughly the same time. I think Orr and Park played together only 10 games. That deal and the Gretzky to LA trade were the biggest shocks I can ever remember in the game. Earth shattering deals really.
Pie McKenzie was actually dealt also to the Flyers but jumped to the WHA. Imagine that rat bastard as a Flyer? He would of fit right in with the Clarke bunch!
Clarke, Van Impe and McKenzie- cheapshots par excellence!
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Old 02-07-2013, 05:08 PM
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Spot on BJ.

From Sanderson..
Thanks and yup that is exactly what they always did. Take a look at the Cashman/Kurtenbach fight from NY in the Sanderson bounty game in 1970! Cashman gets the jump and throws a few lefts and Kurtenbach starts to get free and fire the rights and here comes a gang of Bruins into the fray along the glass!
Great find of that Sanderson quote and Kudos to the Turk for his honesty!
Pie McKenzie was ridiculous!
The late Jim Gordon once made a joke about Rat Linseman being like the NY Mass Transit because he was always arriving late that made Espo start laughing in the booth over the air but McKenzie and the original BB Bruins were the Kings of arriving late and ganging in!
Imagine the league making a rule change just for them?
Who would know that years later jackoff linesman Kevin Collins would be the guy breaking the 3rd man in rule destroying more fights!
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Old 02-07-2013, 05:19 PM
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When it comes to the impact they had on the sport and the league as a whole, I think that you have to go with the Flyers. There's a reason why the Broad Street Bullies are legendary.

However, if you're talking pure toughness and who I would rather not have to face, the answer is the Bruins. You have three of the top 25 guys of all-time in O'Reilly, Wensink and Jonathan, plus depth. No one is looking forward to that.
Agreed that the Bruins under Grapes had the better fighters but the 1974 and 1975 Flyers made goon tactics work for them and they always stuck together!
It's why I wrote that Holmgren and Wilson were bigger and Bridgman could really fight, in my opinion, but the 1974 and 1975 Flyers were tougher than the 1979 Flyers that the Rangers destroyed!
There is noway in the world that the 1974 and 1975 Flyers would of not emptied the bench at least once if they were getting destroyed 28-8 in goals in the playoff series like the 1979 Flyers got destroyed by the Shero led Rangers!
It's funny but guys like Clarke, Barber, Dupont, Kelly, and MacLeish were still on the 1979 Flyers and yet they didn't react like the earlier Flyers did!
I really think guys like Van Impe and Dornhoefer were missed on the 1979 Flyers because they were not good fighters but they were nasty dirty guys and rat bastards! Van Impe would of been spearing the Rangers best players and Dornhoefer would of been jumping someone from behind like he was famous for!
The Flyers brought in Holmgren and Wilson but they missed guys like Van Impe and Dornhoefer and looking back I'm surprised that they never gave Schultz a tryout when Scotty Bowman sent him to the minors! It would of been interesting to see a Schultz II in Philly!
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Old 02-07-2013, 05:32 PM
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V Hadfield got under his skin when Bernie was still a Leaf . . . . the famous mask incident.
My old man was at that game and it's the Vic Hadfield before the $250,000/year contract that he received from the Cat so he wouldn't jump to the WHA!
Suddenly it became hit them with your wallet Vic and the 50 goal, 142 penalty minute Hadfield was never seen from again!
He was one of the worst Captain's in history and imagine your Team Captain standing there with a front row seat watching Dale Rolfe take about eight rights from Schultz in game 7 and then sitting in the penalty box laughing in the last minute drinking a fan's beer as the Rangers tried to vain to tie the score?
Francis went nuts when he was told of Hadfield's penalty box nonsense and was already pis*ed at him for not jumping in to save Rolfe and a month later bye bye Vic to the Penguins for Nick Beverley!
Vic Hadfield really disappointed so many Ranger fans!
What a disgraceful Team Captain in 1972 to 1974 after he got the big bucks!
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Old 02-07-2013, 06:56 PM
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My old man was at that game and it's the Vic Hadfield before the $250,000/year contract that he received from the Cat so he wouldn't jump to the WHA!
Suddenly it became hit them with your wallet Vic and the 50 goal, 142 penalty minute Hadfield was never seen from again!
He was one of the worst Captain's in history and imagine your Team Captain standing there with a front row seat watching Dale Rolfe take about eight rights from Schultz in game 7 and then sitting in the penalty box laughing in the last minute drinking a fan's beer as the Rangers tried to vain to tie the score?
Francis went nuts when he was told of Hadfield's penalty box nonsense and was already pis*ed at him for not jumping in to save Rolfe and a month later bye bye Vic to the Penguins for Nick Beverley!
Vic Hadfield really disappointed so many Ranger fans!
What a disgraceful Team Captain in 1972 to 1974 after he got the big bucks!
I had Vic's book when I was a kid. It was a good book, I'll tell you that. I mentioned it here:

Old School guys must have played with “concussions.”

It's funny, there's also a thread about "the code" going and in the book, Vic talks about a fight Sather had with Schultz and how Schultz busted him up pretty good with a taped fist and how pissed Sather was about that. Slats was a pretty interesting player, was with the Bruins just before the cups and then the Rags and then MTL after that.

Last edited by Flyer_Frank; 02-07-2013 at 06:59 PM.
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Old 02-07-2013, 11:50 PM
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I had Vic's book when I was a kid. It was a good book, I'll tell you that. I mentioned it here:

Old School guys must have played with “concussions.”

It's funny, there's also a thread about "the code" going and in the book, Vic talks about a fight Sather had with Schultz and how Schultz busted him up pretty good with a taped fist and how pissed Sather was about that. Slats was a pretty interesting player, was with the Bruins just before the cups and then the Rags and then MTL after that.
When it came to Dave Schultz, there was no such thing as a CODE! Remember that he was like a shark coming up from behind non-fighter Rick Middleton and jumping him for no reason at all except to intimidate the Rangers! He also started spitting on Brad Park's back at MSG after a mini-fight in the 1974 playoffs and then went into his caveman act!
Regarding Slats, he was a checker and penalty killer who was Emile Francis idea of replacing Orland Kurtenbach's muscle in 1971. The problem was it cost the Rangers Syl Apps who went on to have like five excellent years in Pittsburgh! It was a ridiculous trade by Francis!
First he gets rid of Big Kurt in the 1970 expansion draft and Kurtenbach is made the Canucks first Team Captain and scored 53 points in 52 games even with a knee injury that caused him to miss 26 games in 1970/71!
Then he trades the young kid in Apps who was gonna be the Rangers new 3rd line Center! He gave Apps a cup of coffee and no real opportunity and dealt for Stemkowski from Detroit after he got in trouble with Ned Harkness and made Stemmer the 3rd line center!
Most of the time Francis didn't like to play youngsters and if you didn't produce right away you were screwed! The only reason why Sarge Vickers got a chance to play was because Gene Carr, who Francis had a boner for, sucked so bad in 1972. Vickers was getting the same treatment that guys like Widing, Berenson, Dupont, Durbano, Egers, Luce, Murphy, Apps, Bobby MacMillan received in NY!
After time in the minors first, he did play Brad Park, Vickers, Fairbairn, Greschner, Middleton, and guys from the WHA like Dillon and Hickey but overall he didn't want to play the Ranger kids in the system and would deal them for older players!

Just for the hell of it, lets look at what Sather produced as a Ranger and Apps as a Penguin:

Sather: 188 games with 18 goals and 42 points!

Apps: 495 games with 151 goals and 500 points!

Apps averaged 25 goals and 83 points in 82 games as a Penguin as a true playmaking center and Sather averaged 8 goals and 18 points in 82 games as a Ranger as a sh*tty fighter and penalty killer and 4th liner!

WTF Emile?????
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Old 02-07-2013, 11:51 PM
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Flyers hands down.
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Old 02-08-2013, 12:01 AM
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Dave Schultz idea of a CODE:


Rick Middleton vs Dave Schultz Apr 3, 1975 -...


We have written here about how gutless that the officials were back then especially in Philly!

Middleton picked up 5 minutes for minding his own business and getting jumped and Schultz only got 7 minutes. It should of been nothing on Middleton and a 5 minute Ranger PP and game misconduct to Schultz!
Instead later that game, Schultz went after Giacomin picking up 12 minutes to Eddie's 2 minutes but was still in the game!
The only good thing that game was that Sanderson beat Clarke in a fight and Vickers beat Van Impe in a fight and the game ended in a 1-1 tie!



03-Apr-75


New York Rangers 1 @ Philadelphia Flyers 1


First Period
1 - NYR : Ratelle 35 (EV) 0:15
2 - PHI : Clarke 26 (Harris, Leach) (EV) 11:27

Penalties - PHI - Dupont 0:53 ; NYR - Butler 4:19 ; NYR - Butler ( (maj)) 4:19 ; PHI - Watson Jo 4:19 ; PHI - Watson Jo ( (maj)) 4:19 ; NYR - Middleton ( (maj)) 8:03 ; PHI - Schultz 8:03 ; PHI - Schultz ( (maj)) 8:03 ; NYR - Stemkowski ( (maj)) 15:15 ; PHI - Lonsberry ( (maj)) 15:15 ; PHI - Dupont 17:26 ; NYR - Sanderson ( (maj)) 20:00 ; PHI - Clarke ( (maj)) 20:00 ; PHI - Dornhoefer (Misconduct (10 min)) 20:00 ;


Second Period
No Scoring

Penalties - NYR - Giacomin 0:59 ; PHI - Saleski 0:59 ; PHI - Schultz 0:59 ; PHI - Schultz (Misconduct (10 min)) 0:59 ; NYR - Greschner 5:10 ; NYR - Harris (Game Misconduct) 7:56 ; PHI - Saleski (Misconduct (10 min)) 7:56 ; PHI - Bladon 8:23 ; NYR - Vickers 8:59 ; NYR - Vickers ( (maj)) 8:59 ; PHI - Van Impe ( (maj)) 8:59 ;


Third Period
No Scoring

Penalties - None


Shots On Goal
1 2 3 T
New York Rangers 9 12 6 27
Philadelphia Flyers 11 11 8 30


Powerplay Conversions
New York Rangers : 0 of 0
Philadelphia Flyers : 0 of 0


Goaltenders
Giacomin (NYR) (T) 29 saves on 30 shots - 60:00 mins
Parent (PHI) (T) 26 saves on 27 shots - 60:00 mins


3 Stars of the Game
1 - Bobby Clarke (PHI)
2 - Ed Giacomin (NYR)
3 - Joe Watson (PHI)


Officials
Referee: Bruce Hood
Linesman: Matt Pavelich
Linesman: Jim Christison


Gutless bastard Bruce Hood!

What are the odds?
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Old 02-08-2013, 12:13 AM
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Isn't Bruce Hood the ref that was forced to quit after the Good Friday Massacre?
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